Be wary of definitive arguments

20/11/2014

In your practice be wary of definitive arguments – especially of the “my great expert said this and they must be right” variety leading to an argument about who is the greater expert – they are a distraction from the reality of internal experience. There is only one solution – use the scientific method – collect data, read around it, ask recognised experts and practice, practice, practice to observe what actually happens in your body – in other words make up your own mind.

Accept the teaching of others as guidance, signposts in the style of “look over there, you may find something interesting”. Remember that where internal experience is involved then language is a very unreliable communication – a word can mean one thing to one person and something else to another – it can even mean different things to the same person at different times – and even during the course of the same conversation.

This is a major benefit of hands-on correction – the teacher cannot tell you verbally and you could not accurately understand the words anyway even in the same language – but by correcting physically he/she can move your body close to what they are seeking to transmit and you the student can have a direct experience of that holistically, to be held in memory for later practice.

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